Author Topic: 3xv: Project Phoenix  (Read 162976 times)

Warwick

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Re: 3xv: Project Phoenix
« Reply #135 on: March 11, 2019, 12:12:56 AM »
Good work, Steve. The more grief something gives you, the more satisfying it is when you crack it, eh?

I was going to suggest that you remove the new coating on the end of the shaft for the end bearing, but it looks like you've taken care of that. The dust seals in the end cap might seal better of you smooth down that textured coating in the sealing area too, perhaps?   

Onwards and upwards!  8) (-P)
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 12:17:50 AM by Warwick »
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Steveog

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Re: 3xv: Project Phoenix
« Reply #136 on: March 11, 2019, 01:21:58 AM »
Thanks, Warwick. First the countershaft sprocket, then the swinger pivot and now these fookin? bearing sleeves. A real threesome might actually kill me. This threepeat was a true effort, but really satisfying.

Yes. I should have had the bearing seal area on the end of the swinger masked before powder-coating. I don?t know of a tool that can be used to do a precise job of it now. I used a hand-held belt sander to clean the outer surface at the pivot cavity opening, but the powder coat is very tough. (DUH).

Seems a socket-like tool with an abrasive inside surface would be perfect to remove the coating. I just have never seen such a device.

Maybe I can make my own. If you or anyone has an idea, I?m open to ideas.

Here?s to a couple of cold ones. Victory party has already started.
Brief, fleeting Glory. Which of itself cannot last, but while it does is the greatest game of all.

James P

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Re: 3xv: Project Phoenix
« Reply #137 on: March 17, 2019, 08:22:56 AM »
...Seems a socket-like tool with an abrasive inside surface would be perfect to remove the coating. I just have never seen such a device.

Maybe I can make my own. If you or anyone has an idea, I?m open to ideas.

Steve,

The 'easy' way for me would be to cut a thin strip of abrasive paper or cloth (of whatever grade you think suitable), about the same width as the length of the sealing surface on the swing arm tube. Loop it around the circumference of the swing arm pivot tube, grasp one end with each hand and gradually work it backwards and forwards all around the tube as required. By using suitable grade abrasive, force and speed, you can gradually remove the powder without going too far. Once you have broken through the powder finish, you may consider changing to a finer grade abrasive to finish off (also consider using WD40, soapy water etc. to keep the abrasive wet as you use it). You may like to cover adjacent parts of the swing arm (on which you want to keep the powder finish) with some durable adhesive tape if there is any likelihood of the abrasive touching it.

A more 'precision' alternative would be to set the swing arm up on a milling machine with the tube oriented vertically in the chuck of a rotary table. Using a cutter of suitable length and small diameter (or small diameter abrasive-band-on-arbor assembly), gradually bring the swing arm closer to the spinning cutter until the powder finish is only just removed, then slowly rotate the swing arm 360 degrees until the same finish is achieved around the entire circumference. There is of course a lot of 'faffing about' involved in setting this up, so you may get an almost equal result by going carefully with the first suggested method!

Let us know how you get on... :)

Regards,
James

Steveog

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Re: 3xv: Project Phoenix
« Reply #138 on: March 17, 2019, 05:41:53 PM »
Good ideas, James. Thank You. I have made a tool from thin wall 46mm (ID) aluminum tubing. The OD of the swingarm pivot is 42mm.

The plan is to hold 200 grit sandpaper in place inside the tubing with rubber strip press-fit by a 32mm, 1/2? drive socket. The socket then serves as the drive for spinning the tool with hand drill and taking off the majority of the coating. The swinger will be held in a vice with rubber end caps to avoid damage.

I have no idea if this will work. The tool is assembled. I will post a picture, later.

Your first method, James would be my fallback. Yes. Masking off the swinger is crucial.

Appreciate you kind wishes. Watch this space.

My best. Steve.

Brief, fleeting Glory. Which of itself cannot last, but while it does is the greatest game of all.

Steveog

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Re: 3xv: Project Phoenix
« Reply #139 on: March 17, 2019, 10:39:49 PM »
James and All. Made good progress on the swinger today. My OTO tool works, but the power coating clogs the 200 grit sand paper quickly. Had to tear it apart and re-load the abrasive three (3) times. Believe the pictures will tell the story. The end cap seal fits tight and moves freely, but the job is only about 90% finished.

After the first pass with the coarse abrasive, I then used a 180 grit Dremel polishing tool to clean it up further. Everyone knows how long those Dremel attachments last. I burned up the only two I had getting to what you see here.

Big problem solved, now just a trip to town tomorrow for 4-5 Dremel Attachments and I can move on.

Thanks for your ideas and interest in my project.

Steve
Brief, fleeting Glory. Which of itself cannot last, but while it does is the greatest game of all.

ybk

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Re: 3xv: Project Phoenix
« Reply #140 on: March 18, 2019, 12:45:59 AM »
I've always just used paint stripper to remove powder coat from unmasked areas. I thought it wouldn't work but it just bubbled up the power coat same as any other paint. Using a tiny brush I did detailed removal.. (maybe my powder coating was crap? or the paint stripper I used was bad ass..it was a gel type)

Steveog

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Re: 3xv: Project Phoenix
« Reply #141 on: March 18, 2019, 02:33:13 AM »
Good suggestion to clean up the powder coating that remains, Karl. The guys who did my PC did a great job. Their stuff was a bitch to attack. (Of course, it was my error in not asking for proper masking in the first place.)

After blasting, they kept open the chain adjustment marks and the VIN number. Outstanding customer service. Their owner is a veteran flat-tracker.

Their coating was so good, I�ve since splashed brake cleaner on it with no impact.

Thanks for the tip, though. Paint remover is a lot cheaper and far less of an engineering excercise than Dremel attachments and my homemade tool.

I�ll just ask for the �secret death formula� paint stripper. If it doesn�t work, I�ve got a backup plan ready.

Thanks, again.

Steve

Brief, fleeting Glory. Which of itself cannot last, but while it does is the greatest game of all.